Immunize for a healthy future: Know, Check, Protect. This is the message of this year’s World Immunization Week, on 24-30 April. This short video encourages you to ask your local health clinic which vaccines you need, check whether your vaccinations are up-to-date, and to get the vaccines you need, when you need them.

Happy World Health Day, world!  Find out how #Just1Bite can cause serious diseases and how to protect yourself [Source: World Health Organization]

Happy World Health Day, world!  Find out how #Just1Bite can cause serious diseases and how to protect yourself [Source: World Health Organization]

The World Health Organization and partners support #Ebola outbreak response in #Guinea by mobilising international expertise, such as on contact tracing and data management, clinical care, infection prevention and control including isolation services, surveillance and epidemiology, reference laboratories, laboratory diagnosis, logistics and social mobilization. 

WHO is also supporting countries in mobilizing financial and human resources as well as supplies such as personal protective equipment. 
More on #Ebola: http://goo.gl/4WhdbD #AskEbola

 

The Global Divide: Health Inequalities Among Women and Children

Tune in for a Google+Hangout on “How Young People Are Transforming the Health World” at 9:00 a.m. EST (14:00 UTC) on Wednesday, January 8, 2014!  Special Adviser for Global Youth Issues Zeenat Rahman and CEO and co-founder of Global Health Corps Barbara Bush will discuss innovative solutions to global health problems with young professionals in the field @globalyouthissues http://goo.gl/iPsdqM

Happy World Health Day. “Control your blood pressure. Control your life”

Happy World Health Day. “Control your blood pressure. Control your life”

Boosting child survival rates will be the focus of a national summit in Mahabalipuram, India, February 7–9 that will bring together more than 200 delegates ranging from policymakers and representatives of development agencies to global health practitioners and civil society members.The national summit on the “Call to Action for Child Survival and Development,” jointly organized by India’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, UNICEF and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), will be an opportunity for participants to share experiences and pledge to meet India’s child survival and development goals. Learn More

Boosting child survival rates will be the focus of a national summit in Mahabalipuram, India, February 7–9 that will bring together more than 200 delegates ranging from policymakers and representatives of development agencies to global health practitioners and civil society members.The national summit on the “Call to Action for Child Survival and Development,” jointly organized by India’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, UNICEF and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), will be an opportunity for participants to share experiences and pledge to meet India’s child survival and development goals. Learn More

Americans Abroad Video Series:  The U.S. Mission is pleased to introduce Dr. Reuben Granich, working at the World Health Organization (WHO) as a Medical Officer developing guidelines, recommendations and strategies to prevent HIV and tuberculosis

Remarks by Ambassador Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, At the 56th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women

Thank you, Madame Chair. It is a great pleasure to join you today at the Commission on the Status of Women to speak about why the empowerment of rural women is vital to global development.

Growing evidence shows that investing in women is not only the right thing to do - it is the smart thing to do.

As Secretary Clinton has said, “To achieve the economic expansion we all seek, we need to unlock a vital source of growth that can power our economies in the decades to come. And that vital source of growth is women.”  In rural economies - on which 70 percent of the world’s poor depend - women have a unique potential not only to help drive economic growth but also to help solve the crucial development challenges of our time, from food security to sustainable energy to global health.  It is for this reason that the United States champions the advancement of rural women across a wide range of policies in key areas.

Take food security. Women are a sizable part of the world’s agricultural workforce, and are the outright majority in dozens of countries. They manage this in addition to caring for children and families, preparing meals and managing households, procuring water and firewood, and often also laboring in small-scale trading and enterprise.

Yet many rural women lack access to the capital, property, education and physical security that are essential to unlocking their potential. Women receive fewer and smaller loans than men do, and lack equal access to seeds, tools, and fertilizer. Closing the gender gap in agriculture would generate significant gains. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, providing women equal access to productive resources could raise total agricultural output in developing countries by 2.5 to 4 percent and reduce the number of hungry by 100 to 150 million people worldwide.

That is why women are central to the U.S. global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future. In Kenya, we are tailoring agriculture extension services to fit women’s schedules and training women in leadership and business development. In Uganda, we are working with partners to implement a women-led “community connector” program that addresses nutrition, sanitation, and agriculture in an integrated way. And we are piloting new tools to measure gender-specific results,including an innovative “Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index” that was launched yesterday here at the CSW. 

Rural women also have significant potential to contribute to sustainable energy solutions. Nearly 3 billion people globally still rely on traditional cookstoves and open fires to prepare food. Smoke exposure from these traditional methods causes an estimated two million premature deaths annually, predominantly women and children. Cookstoves also emit black carbon and greenhouse gases. As we work to build a global market for clean cookstoves, we need to involve women at every step in order to increase adoption rates and generate new economic opportunities, such as local businesses for sales, distribution and repair. We also need to make women a high priority at Rio+20.

Women can drive global health outcomes, and unlocking the potential of rural women requires focusing on the health needs of women and girls. That is why a key priority of the Obama Administration’s Global Health Initiative (GHI) is the Women, Girls, and Gender Equality Principle, which aims to redress gender imbalances related to health. We know it can work: in countries with a long-term commitment to family planning and maternal and newborn health, we have seen maternal mortality drop 30 percent or more. That is also why United States is proud to co-sponsor this year’s resolution on maternal mortality - as we have done in prior years - with dozens of partners from every continent. 

Finally, women and girls should be at the forefront of our common efforts to combat violence, abuse and discrimination, with special attention to lesbian and transgender women, ethnic minorities, and the displaced, who are among the most vulnerable. 

When President Obama signed his landmark Presidential Policy Directive on Global Development, the first of its kind by a U.S. administration, he elevated development as a core pillar of American foreign policy. He also called for new investment in women and girls as powerful forces for change in their economies and societies.

In my travels around the world, I seek out women to hear their views on the future, and I am always honored and humbled by their courage, ingenuity, and determination.  A few months ago, I met with brave women in Libya.  They spoke proudly of their role in the revolution and sought no less of a role in leading Libya into the future.  Their experience, like so many others, shows us that we cannot leave half of any country’s rich human potential untapped.

Speaking before the UN General Assembly last fall, President Obama challenged UN member states to “announce the steps we are taking to break down economic and political barriers that stand in the way of women and girls. That is what our commitment to human progress demands.”This is why we are here today.  This session is an opportunity for us to challenge ourselves to go still farther, for there is much work yet to be done.

Thank you.

###

A photo of a Millennium Development Goals Postcard from our US Mission to the UN in Geneva.

A photo of a Millennium Development Goals Postcard from our US Mission to the UN in Geneva.

Secretary Clinton Names Ellen DeGeneres as Special Envoy for Global AIDS Awareness

"I’m honored to have been chosen by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as Special Envoy for Global AIDS awareness. The fight against AIDS is something that has always been close to my heart. And I’m happy that I can use my platform to educate people and spread hope. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have to go look up what “envoy” means," said talk show host Ellen DeGeneres.

U.S. Acknowledges World Heart Day Through Global and Domestic Initiatives

  

By: Krysten Carrera, a Presidential Management Fellow at the National Cancer Institute. She presently serves in the Department of State’s Bureau of International Organization Affairs (IO).

Today marks the eleventh anniversary of World Heart Day, created to educate people around the globe about the dangers of cardiovascular disease. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes 29 percent of all deaths globally each year, making it the world’s number one killer. CVD is also the deadliest of the major non-communicable diseases, or NCDs, a disease group that was one of the major themes of this year’s UN General Assembly high-level meeting.

High-impact, affordable interventions such as tobacco control, salt reduction, improved diets and physical activity, and treatment of people at high risk of CVD, will help tens of millions of people avoid dying prematurely from CVD, namely from heart attack and stroke. With this in mind, the United States is engaged in the prevention and control of CVD domestically and internationally. Read More

Non-Communicable Diseases Take Center Stage at the UN General Assembly

     

Krysten Carrera is a Presidential Management Fellow at the National Cancer Institute. She presently serves in the Department of State’s Bureau of International Organization Affairs (IO).

Over the past two days, the eyes of the world have turned to the United Nations Headquarters in New York for the 66th UN General Assembly, where presidents and prime ministers assemble to discuss pressing global challenges of our day. Non-communicable diseases, or NCDs — including cancer, heart disease, and diabetes — are among those challenges. NCDs cause two-thirds of deaths around the globe. This week’s General Assembly events featured the first-ever High-Level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases. This meeting serves as a timely opportunity for the world community to focus needed attention and leadership on the growing threat posed by NCDs and to spur worldwide action. More»

Addressing the Challenges of Non-Communicable Diseases

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic lung diseases, and diabetes, represent an urgent and growing global public health emergency. 

  • Worldwide, NCDs kill over 35 million people each year, representing nearly two-thirds of the world’s deaths. 
  • More than 80% of these deaths are in low- and middle-income countries, where health systems are not equipped to deal with the increasing disease burden associated with these afflictions.
  • Today in the United States, NCDs account for 70 percent of deaths, limit the activities of tens of millions more Americans, and cost our economy billions each year.  
  •  

The rising tide of non-communicable diseases warrants strengthened action and increased focus from the international community.  In light of this reality, the UN is hosting a high-level summit on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases (Sept. 19-20) to discuss how best the global community can address the growing threat of NCDs. For more information check out our NCD fact sheets here.

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